Oblique Fracture From Car Accident

Posted on January 11, 2019 in

If you’ve been involved in a Manhattan car accident that caused you to sustain a broken bone, also known as a fracture, the last thing you’re worried about is the medical terminology that describes your injuries. However, if another party was at fault for the accident and the injuries you sustained, the type of fracture you sustained and whether or not surgery is required will be helpful for your attorney to know.

What is an Oblique Fracture?

If a bone breaks diagonally, physicians call it an oblique fracture They vary in severity, depending on the trauma of the crash and which bone is affected. They often times occur in the larger bones, such as those found in the arms and legs. Most people who experience an oblique fracture will have pain, bruising, and swelling. Other symptoms might include being unable to move the area or having an abnormal bend or twist in the limb. Some people hear a snap or crack when the break occurs. You may be referred to an orthopedic doctor or surgeon who is a medical specialist that focuses on the diagnosis, correction, prevention and treatment of individuals with skeletal deformities following an accident.

How Painful is an Oblique Fracture?

Most people who experience an oblique fracture will have pain, bruising, and swelling. Other symptoms might include being unable to move the area or having an abnormal bend or twist in the limb. Some people hear a snap or crack when the break occurs. Some people experience prolonged pain.

What is the Treatment for an Oblique Fracture?

According to sharecare, the treatment options for an oblique fracture depend on the severity of the crack or break. You may just require non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory, over-the-counter pills for your pain. Some of the more common ones, referred to as NSAIDs, are aspirin and Ibuprofen such as Advil. In some instances, however, your doctor may need to perform a reduction, which is the process of resetting the bone. In other cases, the doctor may restrict mobility by placing the broken bone in a sling, cast, or brace for several weeks.

Will I Need Surgery?

Sometimes surgery is required to insert nails, screws, wires or other devices to help the bones to heal, such as Open Reduction and Internal Fixation (ORIF). Open reduction means the orthopedist makes a cut to reach the bones and moves them back into their normal position. Internal fixation is the process of placing metal screws, plates or rods on the bone to keep it in place while healing. The internal fixation is not removed.

If you sustain a fracture as the result of a Manhattan car crash, it is important to have experienced legal representation to protect your rights and pursue the compensation you are entitled to. At Michael J. Redenburg, Esq., we handle all accident cases on a contingency fee basis, meaning there is no cost to you until we win your case. Contact us at 212-518-2095 or online.

Michael J. Redenburg, Esq. P.C.

In over a decade of legal practice, Attorney Michael Redenburg began his career defending cases for the clients of insurance companies. Initially defending no-fault claims at a Long Island-based law firm, he then moved on to a Manhattan-based firm where he defended the clients of insurance carriers in auto accident and premises liability matters.

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